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3 Career Options for Military Reserve Members - News - MilitarySpot.com
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3 Career Options for Military Reserve Members

August 28, 2014 - The Military Reserves offer flexibility that a full-time career in the five branches of the military lacks. You train during specified periods of the week or month, but you're able to return to your family and career during the rest of the time. But what careers work well with the skills you'll learn and use in the military, and how can you use military benefits for school to further your career? Look no further than these three popular career choices for people who are part of the active or inactive Reserves.

Nursing

If there's one career that always seems to be growing, it's nursing. Nursing in the Reserves or another branch of the military translates well to the civilian world, too. Your time in the service teaches you how to care for others compassionately and work well in a team environment.

Making the move to the civilian world is easy because there's no metropolitan area that lacks a hospital facility. Plus, there are always options depending upon your level of comfort. For example, you don't have to be a registered nurse. According to theBureau of Labor and Statistics, nursing assistants and orderlies are also in high demand at hospitals, clinics and care facilities and have lower education requirements than RNs, who require a bachelor's degree to administer medications and treat wounds.

If you were a registered nurse in the civilian world, you can use those skills in the military by applying to become a commissioned officer, says .com. The skills and traits you need for nursing in the Reserves are the same you'll need in the civilian world.

Aircraft Maintenance

There's no branch of the military that doesn't have some sort of aircraft, and there are more people who are equipped to maintain those planes and helicopter than there are certified pilots. This is good news if you're looking for work to supplement your time in the Reserves or if you'll soon be retiring.

While there will be differences between the types of craft you work on in the Reserves and in the civilian world, much of that information translates. According to the Federal Aviation Administration, qualified aircraft technicians must have 18 months of experience at a power plant or an airframe. If you haven't yet accrued that much experience, you can attend the FAA-Approved Aviation Maintenance Technician School.

Mechanic certification requires you pass an oral, written and practical test. You can apply to take the tests if you're an American citizen or if you speak English, can provide a passport and have a letter from the airworthiness authority of your home country as well as a document from your employer.

Entrepreneurship

Many members of the military Reserves go on to start their own businesses like this couple, as reported by Entrepreneur Magazine. The confidence they build while serving and the leadership skills they learn work well for this. There are as many businesses as there are people in the world, so consider projects at which you're especially skilled or one that's close to your heart.

Some popular choices include:

* Home building/construction
* Plumbing, electrical, HVAC/R installation and service
* Business consulting
* Franchising (restaurants, hotels, etc.)
* Retail or rental equipment

Some of these careers require additional degrees or certification. If you’re interested in pursuing a career in the skilled trades, there’s the option to attend a vocational school partially funded by your GI Benefits, according to Tulsa Welding School. Regardless of what kind of business you’re interested in, it's smart to consult a business attorney who can advise you about filing the correct forms, taxes and business insurance, among other legalities.


Author Bio:

Audrey Clark is a skilled freelance blogger covering a range of topics from careers and finance to travel and leisure, along with everything in-between. When not writing, she’s always on the lookout for her next adventure. Connect with Audrey on Twitter and Google+.
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